No Such Luck

As I reflect on the past week, I have been humbled – staggered, really – to recognize the extent of my dependence on the Lord’s care. Regrettably, such a view is quite counter-cultural, since it seems that our society believes that with enough hard work and this illusive thing called “luck,” all will be well.

Let me pause for a moment to address the “luck” issue. FYI, here is how the dictionary (Merriam-Webster) defines the word:

a force that brings good fortune or adversity.

So, when we wish someone “good luck,” we are expressing our concurrence with a belief in some “force” outside of God (because this isn’t Star Wars and the Lord is not “the force”), and trusting that blind, random chance can bring about better results in a person’s life than, say, simply trusting the Creator and Sustainer of the universe.

Years ago, I used to say “good luck” quite casually, until I heard a pretty convicting message about it. I’m not saying that it’s a sin to use those words, but I would challenge you to think about it the next time they escape from your lips. Do you really believe what they mean?

By the way, I use the words, “I wish you well” as an alternative. If this topic resonates with you in some way, then I challenge you to find your own words that you can keep in your back pocket the next time you’re tempted to say “good luck” to someone. 💡

In fact, I began reading a book on leadership, and the author had several good recommendations to share, but the one emphasized early and often in the text was this trust in “good luck”. Put another way, just happening to be at the right place at the right time – a coincidence.

I think it’s rubbish.

There is no such thing as coincidence! If you have been blessed, remember to thank God for His providence – His care of you – even if you don’t believe in Him.

And as I was reading the book, I saw compelling evidence that the Lord had blessed the author with an abundance of natural talents, intellectual ability, and opportunities that few of us will likely ever see in our lifetimes. Tellingly, the author chalks up his successes to hard work, having good people around him, and – you guessed it! – plenty of good luck.

While I may never experience the material success that this person has enjoyed, I doubt that he has realized even a moment of the peace and joy that comes from knowing that there is a God in heaven who superintends over all, and goes out of His way to look after the totality of His creation – even when it denies His very existence, power, and authority.

So, this week I am most grateful for the deep understanding that is etched in my mind that God Himself (and God alone!) is the source of my security: as the psalmist says, the Lord is “my portion and my cup,” and He alone makes my way secure. Not a job, not a house, not a hefty bank account, not a car, not even a relationship. These are fine and have their place, but they can never provide a true and lasting sense of security.

That’s God’s job! His, and His alone. ✝️

5D2B3512-8E32-4A0E-B2EC-91AB0D1023AF.jpeg

10 thoughts on “No Such Luck

  1. Oh, I have such pangs for those who do not have the comfort and peace that we have in God! I remember how it was. 😟
    “God bless” and “Godspeed ” are words I use often.
    I am daily thankful for you, your insights, and the way you share with us.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Amen, a delightful message, you’re writing style is good.
    My phrases are “God bless you” or “have a bless day”. I have more but that’s for later. Anytime I use these phrases I pray they resonate with people. Some may not have had anyone say it to them before. 💛

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s